publication

FDP paper published in PLoS ONE

FDP paper published in PLoS ONE

Polgár et al. created a simple food detection test to investigate olfactory capacities of different types of dogs and hand reared wolves. They tested  dogs and wolves in five conditions of increasing difficulity. The results showed that wolves and dog breeds selected for scent work were better than short-nosed dogs and dog from non-scent breeds.  

FDP paper in PLoS ONE

FDP paper in PLoS ONE

Gergely et al. investigated dogs behaviour tovard “unidentified moving objects” (UMO’s) with an A not B error paradigm. They hypothesized that  if a UMO interacted socially with a dog, the UMO would become associated with certain social cues and would subsequently affect dog behaviour. They found that dogs in the Human and Social UMO conditions were more likely […]

Humans spontaneously attribute emotions to an ethologically inspired robot

Humans spontaneously attribute emotions to an ethologically inspired robot

Gácsi et al.  presented  short video sequences to humans, in which a PeopleBot robot and a dog displayed behaviours that corresponded to five emotional states (joy, fear, anger, sadness, and neutral) in a neutral environment. The actions of the robot were developed on the basis of dog expressive behaviours that had been described in previous studies […]

New FDP study

New FDP study

Péter et. al investigated dogs’ performance in an object search tasks in an ostensive context.

New FDP paper published

New FDP paper published

Petró et al. investigated whether dogs are able to recognise the different roles of two UMOs (unidentified moving object) and are able to adjust their communicative behaviour towards them. Dogs’ rapid adjustment of social behaviour towards UMOs suggests that dogs may generalise their experiences with humans to unfamiliar agents and are able to select the […]

Newest FDP paper is out!

Newest FDP paper is out!

This is a very busy (and luckily polific) summer for the FDP group! Abdai et al. investigated whether the social bias in dogs is restricted to human partners.

New publication by the Family Dog Project

And here comes the next FDP paper! Polgár et al. investigated what strategies family dogs use in two types of olfaction-based problems and their success at various distances. The results suggest that despite their ability to successfully collect information through olfaction, family dogs often prioritize other strategies to solve basic choice tasks.

12